Researching Public Law and Public Policy in the Public Interest

On May 5th, CLiME hosted a national conference on Trauma, Schools and Poverty. A full archive of the conference, including Dr. Margevich's write up and panel contents can be viewed here:

Jeena Shah is a Visiting Assistant Clinical Professor of Law in Rutgers Law School’s Constitutional Rights and International Human Rights Clinics. She recently spoke with CLiME staff member Tara Marlowe to discuss her approach to community lawyering.

Reduced public funding forces municipal courts to focus on revenue generating fines, resulting in the uneven application of justice. Court fines and jail time in lieu of ability to pay has disparate impact on poor and minority constituents. These practices can have lasting and devastating consequences for individuals, regardless of whether they are ultimately found culpable of any charge. In this paper, Rutgers law student Michael Simone illuminates how this process plays out in New Jersey and beyond.

Download the paper

Cities may sue banks for injuries to their tax base caused by unlawful conduct against homeowners, according to the Supreme Court in a May 1st decision that was closely watched by fair housing advocates.  An unusual split among the justices produced the 5-4 opinion in Bank of America v. City of Miami.  The federal Fair Housing Act (FHA) ruling demonstrates that the aggregation of direct harms can produce broader consequences that may be actionable by indirect victims.

Legal Memorandum on Trauma, Schools and Poverty

Preliminary Research on Evidence of Psychological Trauma in the International Realm

 

By Kaitlyn Maltese, CLiME Research Associate, Rutgers Law School

February 2017

This paper is available for download below.

Introduction

Legal Memorandum on Trauma, Schools and Poverty

Inquiry into Emotional Disturbance Classification for Children

By Kaitlyn Maltese, CLiME Research Associate, Rutgers Law School

 

February 2017

This paper is available for download below.

Introduction

ABSTRACT: This analysis addresses the disparity in prenatal health outcomes between the City of Paterson and Wayne Township in New Jersey. It guides the reader through the experiences of a hypothetical pregnant woman living in Paterson to examine the institutional and non-institutional factors that prevent this pregnant woman, and others like her, from accessing appropriate prenatal care. This paper also discusses the relationship between the inability to access proper prenatal care and the perpetuation of poverty and inequality.

"Lawmakers in eighteen states have introduced legislation to curb protests. Citing concerns over 'paid professional protesters' and safety, these laws would increase penalities, and in one case, allowing the state to seize assets of people involved."

Read this story in its entirety at the Washington Post.

If the nation’s capital were free of its stark racial inequities, it could be a more prosperous and competitive city—one where everyone could reach their full potential and build better lives for themselves and their families.

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