Researching Public Law and Public Policy in the Public Interest

On May 5th, CLiME hosted a national conference on Trauma, Schools and Poverty. A full archive of the conference, including Dr. Margevich's write up and panel contents can be viewed here:

Legal Memorandum on Trauma, Schools and Poverty

Preliminary Research on Evidence of Psychological Trauma in the International Realm

 

By Kaitlyn Maltese, CLiME Research Associate, Rutgers Law School

February 2017

This paper is available for download below.

Introduction

Legal Memorandum on Trauma, Schools and Poverty

Inquiry into Emotional Disturbance Classification for Children

By Kaitlyn Maltese, CLiME Research Associate, Rutgers Law School

 

February 2017

This paper is available for download below.

Introduction

ABSTRACT: This analysis addresses the disparity in prenatal health outcomes between the City of Paterson and Wayne Township in New Jersey. It guides the reader through the experiences of a hypothetical pregnant woman living in Paterson to examine the institutional and non-institutional factors that prevent this pregnant woman, and others like her, from accessing appropriate prenatal care. This paper also discusses the relationship between the inability to access proper prenatal care and the perpetuation of poverty and inequality.

It is with great pride that the Rutgers Center on Law, Inequality and Metropolitan Equity (CLiME) announces the release of our literature review for the Trauma, Schools and Poverty Project (TSP). "A Critical Review of the Psychological Literature" provides a critical and comprehensive review of the empirical literature literature on the sequelae of childhood exposure to potentially traumatic events (PTEs), with special emphasis on low socioeconomic status populationsat disparate risk for exposure to PTEs across the lifespan.
Excluded from the Affordable Care Act because of politics, thousands of poor Americans grapple with the toll — physical and psychological — of being uninsured.
More than 1,200 students, disproportionately black, are arrested under South Carolina's "disturbing schools" law each year, for everything from disobeying a teacher’s order to fighting in the hallway. For many, like Ms. Kenny, it means a first, stinging encounter with the criminal justice system, bringing the stigma of an arrest record and often derailing their schooling — a potential step in what has been described nationally as a pernicious “schools to prison pipeline."
"We have to do a better job of assessing the cause of violence, the impact of violence – and this is where trauma-informed care plays a major role," community activist Jack Farrell explains in his interview with CLiME. 
The poor in some cities — big ones like New York and Los Angeles, and also quite a few smaller ones like Birmingham, Ala. — live nearly as long as their middle-class neighbors or have seen rising life expectancy in the 21st century. But in some other parts of the country, adults with the lowest incomes die on average as young as people in much poorer nations like Rwanda, and their life spans are getting shorter.

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