Researching Public Law and Public Policy in the Public Interest
Two years ago, CLiME and the Violence Institute partnered on twin aspects of the crisis of disproportionate exposure to childhood trauma among students living in concentrated poverty. CLiME’s law and policy analyses of causal structural factors are contained on our site and blog. For the first time, we publish here the empirical findings of Dr. Alicia Lukachko, our partner, who worked with a group of young people aged 8-18 referred to a partial hospitalization program from their schools in Newark, Irvington and East Orange.
David Troutt, founding director of the Rutgers Center on Law in Metropolitan Equity (CLiME) was featured in on NJ.com this week: A recent report by Rutgers University found the risk of displacement for Newarkers is already high, even though threat of gentrification remains premature. "Displacement through gentrification comes about because cities make deliberate tax policy decisions that favor certain elements over others," said David Troutt, one of the authors of the report and director of Rutger's Center for Law, Inequality and Metropolitan Equity. "A city like Newark has to exercise that same authority to protect (residents)," he added. "This is an obligation to make sure as it plans for growth, it also plans for affordability. Otherwise people disappear."

Two years ago, CLiME and the Violence Institute partnered on twin aspects of the crisis of disproportionate exposure to childhood trauma among students living in concentrated poverty. CLiME’s law and policy analyses of causal structural factors are contained on our site and blog. For the first time, we publish here the empirical findings of Dr.

Making Newark Work for Newarkers is the full report of the Rutgers University-Newark Project on Equitable Growth in the City of Newark, written by CLiME and incorporating research conducted in conjunction with a university working group whose work began last April. We viewed the goal of equitable growth first in the context of housing issues before expanding to think about the fabric of community life and economic opportunity in the city. This Executive Summary includes the main findings from each chapter as well as the highlights from a comprehensive set of recommendations we submitted to Mayor Ras Baraka on October 27, 2017. The key fact that animates any study of equity and opportunity in a city undergoing downtown redevelopment is this: Newarkers face a longstanding crisis of housing affordability.

Reduced public funding forces municipal courts to focus on revenue generating fines, resulting in the uneven application of justice. Court fines and jail time in lieu of ability to pay has disparate impact on poor and minority constituents. These practices can have lasting and devastating consequences for individuals, regardless of whether they are ultimately found culpable of any charge. In this paper, Rutgers law student Michael Simone illuminates how this process plays out in New Jersey and beyond.

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ABSTRACT: This analysis addresses the disparity in prenatal health outcomes between the City of Paterson and Wayne Township in New Jersey. It guides the reader through the experiences of a hypothetical pregnant woman living in Paterson to examine the institutional and non-institutional factors that prevent this pregnant woman, and others like her, from accessing appropriate prenatal care. This paper also discusses the relationship between the inability to access proper prenatal care and the perpetuation of poverty and inequality.

The number of children living in poverty in Essex County has increased over the past 15 years, with 1 in 3 children now living in poverty. The number of children in highly concentrated poverty has increased, and is spreading from the City of Newark to its inner ring suburbs. http://www.endinequality.com/home-1/2017/2/2/issues-brief-child-poverty-...
CLiME Director David Troutt comments on the the New Jersey Supreme Court's latest Mt. Laurel decision: "Even amid dramatic national change, a lot about life is still local."

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