Researching Public Law and Public Policy in the Public Interest

Publications

On May 5, 2017 CLiME hosted an interdisciplinary conference around systemic response to psychological trauma in youth. The full conference agenda, slides and videos can be viewed here.

Legal Memorandum on Trauma, Schools and Poverty

Preliminary Research on Evidence of Psychological Trauma in the International Realm

 

By Kaitlyn Maltese, CLiME Research Associate, Rutgers Law School

February 2017

This paper is available for download below.

Introduction

Legal Memorandum on Trauma, Schools and Poverty

Inquiry into Emotional Disturbance Classification for Children

By Kaitlyn Maltese, CLiME Research Associate, Rutgers Law School

 

February 2017

This paper is available for download below.

Introduction

ABSTRACT: This analysis addresses the disparity in prenatal health outcomes between the City of Paterson and Wayne Township in New Jersey. It guides the reader through the experiences of a hypothetical pregnant woman living in Paterson to examine the institutional and non-institutional factors that prevent this pregnant woman, and others like her, from accessing appropriate prenatal care. This paper also discusses the relationship between the inability to access proper prenatal care and the perpetuation of poverty and inequality.

"Lawmakers in eighteen states have introduced legislation to curb protests. Citing concerns over 'paid professional protesters' and safety, these laws would increase penalities, and in one case, allowing the state to seize assets of people involved."

Read this story in its entirety at the Washington Post.

The number of children living in poverty in Essex County has increased over the past 15 years, with 1 in 3 children now living in poverty. The number of children in highly concentrated poverty has increased, and is spreading from the City of Newark to its inner ring suburbs.
While the Affirmatively Furthering Fair Housing rule requires cities to assess their housing stock in order to reduce disparities, the Newark Housing Authority follows the national pattern of dismissing racial integration.
The Peoples Emergency Center Community Development Corporation has developed a new complex of affordable housing projects, designed for low income artists in West Powelton’s Promise Zone in Philadelphia.
It is with great pride that the Rutgers Center on Law, Inequality and Metropolitan Equity (CLiME) announces the release of our literature review for the Trauma, Schools and Poverty Project (TSP). "A Critical Review of the Psychological Literature" provides a critical and comprehensive review of the empirical literature literature on the sequelae of childhood exposure to potentially traumatic events (PTEs), with special emphasis on low socioeconomic status populationsat disparate risk for exposure to PTEs across the lifespan.

Pages

ABSTRACT: This analysis addresses the disparity in prenatal health outcomes between the City of Paterson and Wayne Township in New Jersey. It guides the reader through the experiences of a hypothetical pregnant woman living in Paterson to examine the institutional and non-institutional factors that prevent this pregnant woman, and others like her, from accessing appropriate prenatal care. This paper also discusses the relationship between the inability to access proper prenatal care and the perpetuation of poverty and inequality.

"Lawmakers in eighteen states have introduced legislation to curb protests. Citing concerns over 'paid professional protesters' and safety, these laws would increase penalities, and in one case, allowing the state to seize assets of people involved."

Read this story in its entirety at the Washington Post.

Diversion is intended to relieve overburdened courts and crowded jails, and to spare low-risk offenders from the consequences of a criminal record; but in many places, only people with money can afford a second chance.
Excluded from the Affordable Care Act because of politics, thousands of poor Americans grapple with the toll — physical and psychological — of being uninsured.
The wealth discrepancy between blacks and whites is one of the most stark examples of inequality in America. If national median numbers weren’t bad enough, things look much worse in America’s cities, according to a new paper from the Urban Institute.
The foreclosures in Wayne County, which includes Detroit, aren’t because homeowners owe money to banks. People here are losing their homes because of unpaid property taxes ― taxes that, in many cases, are based on outrageously high assessments that have not been updated for more than two decades.
Should your ZIP code determine your future? Not according to American ideals of social mobility. American realities, however, tell a different story: Where people grow up goes a long way toward shaping how well they will be educated, how stable their families will be, how high their dreams can soar.
More than 1,200 students, disproportionately black, are arrested under South Carolina's "disturbing schools" law each year, for everything from disobeying a teacher’s order to fighting in the hallway. For many, like Ms. Kenny, it means a first, stinging encounter with the criminal justice system, bringing the stigma of an arrest record and often derailing their schooling — a potential step in what has been described nationally as a pernicious “schools to prison pipeline."

Pages

While the Affirmatively Furthering Fair Housing rule requires cities to assess their housing stock in order to reduce disparities, the Newark Housing Authority follows the national pattern of dismissing racial integration.
The Peoples Emergency Center Community Development Corporation has developed a new complex of affordable housing projects, designed for low income artists in West Powelton’s Promise Zone in Philadelphia.
A new regional revolving loan fund will support affordable homes close to bus or rail corridors throughout the Puget Sound area.
The Morris district is notable in that it has long been committed to diversity, even as the composition of its student body has changed. Meanwhile, schools nearby and in New York City have remained deeply segregated.
The Providers Advancing Student Outcomes, or PASO, run by the Colorado Statewide Parent Coalition has received national notice and represents one of the few initiatives targeted to Spanish-speaking early childcare providers, many of whom are undocumented and are not eligible to otherwise receive licensing.
As a whole, Hispanics are disproportionately concentrated in the lowest-opportunity neighborhoods in U.S. metro areas. However, reflecting this ethnic group's diversity, there is great variation by national origin in their distribution across different levels of neighborhood opportunity. Explore Hispanic diversity in terms of access to neighborhoods of opportunity for two dozen Hispanic-origin subgroups across the 100 largest metro areas with new indicators and visualizations by diversitydatakids.org.
The incident began when a school-based police officer happened to walk by Kaylb’s classroom and hear him crying and disrupting other students, according to a lawsuit filed last week by the American Civil Liberties Union on behalf of Kaylb’s family. When Kaylb continued to cry and yell in the hallway, against the officer’s requests, the officer put the child in handcuffs and brought him to the main office, where he sat until a parent arrived.
Low-income families who use housing subsidies to move from struggling to thriving communities represent perhaps the country’s best shot at breaking intergenerational poverty. Landmark research from Harvard University last year showed that children from poor families who make the transition at a young age are more likely to go to college, less likely to become single parents, and earn more money than those who remain behind.
In a situation echoing the crisis in Flint, Mich., a housing complex’s poor, mostly black residents are being resettled because of high lead and arsenic levels.
Fees and fines are levied on young offenders in every state but have an outsize effect on racial minorities and the poor, creating a two-tiered system of justice.

Pages

The number of children living in poverty in Essex County has increased over the past 15 years, with 1 in 3 children now living in poverty. The number of children in highly concentrated poverty has increased, and is spreading from the City of Newark to its inner ring suburbs.
It is with great pride that the Rutgers Center on Law, Inequality and Metropolitan Equity (CLiME) announces the release of our literature review for the Trauma, Schools and Poverty Project (TSP). "A Critical Review of the Psychological Literature" provides a critical and comprehensive review of the empirical literature literature on the sequelae of childhood exposure to potentially traumatic events (PTEs), with special emphasis on low socioeconomic status populationsat disparate risk for exposure to PTEs across the lifespan.
Designed for fairness, Florida's point system fails to account for prejudice. The Herald-Tribune spent a year reviewing tens of millions of records in two state databases — one compiled by the state’s court clerks that tracks criminal cases through every stage of the justice system and the other by the Florida Department of Corrections that notes points scored by felons at sentencing.
If the nation’s capital were free of its stark racial inequities, it could be a more prosperous and competitive city—one where everyone could reach their full potential and build better lives for themselves and their families.
While it is commonly understood that the Great Recession ended on June 2009, the total number of consumers having their foreclosure or negative public records still on their credit report actually peaked in 2015. This paper examines the lasting impact of these negative records on consumer spending and economic recovery.
Oakland stands at the center of a perfect storm. The city and surrounding Bay Area region are experiencing extraordinary economic growth, but housing production is not keeping pace with the escalated demands, nor is sufficient housing affordable to many existing residents and the expanding lower-income workforce. The current displacement crisis undermines the health and wellbeing of its residents, and threatens the historic diversity that gives Oakland its strength and vitality.
Whereas many U.S. cities have experienced a post-recession economic revival, the accompanying run-up in housing costs is threatening to undermine this success by pricing workers out of cities, lengthening commutes, and diminishing livability, the report notes. As a result, local officials are turning to inclusionary zoning (IZ) as a way to combat the shortage of housing that is affordable to moderate- and lower-income workers.
Either New Jersey’s poor have greater access to the resources available in more affluent parts of the state, or the places where New Jersey’s poor live must receive more resources from the areas that have benefited from excluding them.
This memo is the second in a series of documents prepared as part of the Center on Law, Inequality, & Metropolitan Equity's (CLiME) Trauma, Schools, and Poverty project. CLiME does not assume that existing special education or antidiscrimination law in schools is the optimal means for protecting or supporting victims of childhood trauma. More specifically, the antidiscrimination framework will be analyzed through the lens of disability to determine whether children suffering from trauma belong to that protected class and are therefore entitled to certain legal rights. The scope of this memo is limited to New Jersey State law.

Pages

Legal Memorandum on Trauma, Schools and Poverty

Preliminary Research on Evidence of Psychological Trauma in the International Realm

 

By Kaitlyn Maltese, CLiME Research Associate, Rutgers Law School

February 2017

This paper is available for download below.

Introduction

Legal Memorandum on Trauma, Schools and Poverty

Inquiry into Emotional Disturbance Classification for Children

By Kaitlyn Maltese, CLiME Research Associate, Rutgers Law School

 

February 2017

This paper is available for download below.

Introduction

CLiME Writing Specialist Erica Tom presents on Successful Public Scholarship, as part of the writing seminar series given for the Equity and Opportunity Studies Fellowship, a partnership between CLiME at the Rutgers Law School, and the Graduate School at Rutgers University-Newark.
CLiME Writing Specialist Erica Tom presents on Publicly Engaged Scholarship, as part of the writing seminar series given for the Equity and Opportunity Studies Fellowship, a partnership between CLiME at the Rutgers Law School, and the Graduate School at Rutgers University-Newark.
Cheryl Sharp, MSW, MWT, Karen Johnson, MSW, LCSW, and Pamela Black from the National Council on Behavioral Health present an excellent overview of on Trauma-Sensitive Schools.
Prof. Jeffrey Backstrand of the School of Public Health and SPAA presents on public health and health disparities, as part of the workshop series given for the Equity and Opportunity Studies Fellowship, a partnership between CLiME at the Rutgers Law School, and the Graduate School at Rutgers University-Newark.
Rutgers FOCUS Wellness Center
Prof. Patricia Findley of the School of Social Work presents on the dynamic role of social workers and public health, using a case study from Newark, as part of the workshop series given for the Equity and Opportunity Studies Fellowship, a partnership between CLiME at the Rutgers Law School, and the Graduate School at Rutgers University-Newark.
Prof. Jennifer Valverde of the Law School presents on the social determinants of health in New Jersey, as part of the workshop series given for the Equity and Opportunity Studies Fellowship, a partnership between CLiME at the Rutgers Law School, and the Graduate School at Rutgers University-Newark.
Prof. Jon Dubin of the Law School presents on fair housing and structural inequality, as part of the workshop series given for the Equity and Opportunity Studies Fellowship, a partnership between CLiME at the Rutgers Law School, and the Graduate School at Rutgers University-Newark.
Prof. David Troutt presents an overview of the tenets of metropolitan equity used to understand structural inequality through the framework of opportunity, as part of the workshop series given for the Equity and Opportunity Studies Fellowship, a partnership between CLiME at the Rutgers Law School, and the Graduate School at Rutgers University-Newark.